Monthly Archives: June 2011

The ’80s Weren’t Good to You People, Were They?

My mom’s friend (we refer to her as Aunt Charlene) texted me this last weekend, telling me she had a boxful of the Sweet Valley High books. Never heard of ’em. But her husband (one of the town’s judges) took them over to my house. Inside the box was about fifty of the series, a few missing here, a few missing there. Impressive, right? Not all of those books were impressive, though.
 
One title – “Karen Kepplewhite is the World’s Best Kisser.” Believe me, I’m grateful she dropped off the books. But “Karen Kepplewhite is the World’s Best Kisser”? So crazy. The word ‘jazzed’ was often used. It’s from 1983, something like that.
 
Another book – “Cute”. Wow, these books had lame titles. Which makes me think – I’m a 21st century girl. Born in the ’90s, I have no clue what possessed you people to think the way you did in the 1980s.
 
Mom tells me she wore blue eyeshadow. I’ve seen movies from the ’80s with guys wearing shorts no longer than modern girls love to wear. You spoke so weird, saying you were ‘totally jazzed’ and all of these lame lines. So, like I said –
 
The ’80s weren’t good to you people, were they?

Lock and Key (Sarah Dessen)

So, as school got out on tuesday and I went to Hattie’s house that day, and I was dragged to her 4H meeting half an hour from our hometown, she had me read (yet another) of the books she has gotten from book fairs in the library at our school. So, in the course of the two to three hours, I got thirty or forty pages into this book.
 
In this novel, nearly-eighteen-year-old Ruby Cooper has been living alone with her mom since her older sister, Cora, left them to go to college. Ruby’s mom dissappears, though, and Ruby finds herself living with Cora, her husband and CEO/founder of social networking site UMe.com, Jamie, and their yappy, scared-to-death-of-the-oven-and-smoke-detectors, little-bitty dog, Roscoe. On her first night, Ruby tries to run off, but she can’t find the gate to the wooden fence behind Cora aand Jamie’s house, so she happens to meet Nate Cross, their neighbor, as he’s swimming laps in his pool.
 
Eventually, of course, Nate and Ruby end up together. And, even better, Cora and Ruby find their mom – in a rehab clinic in Tennesee.
 
Nate won’t make it easy for Ruby to help him with his hot-tempered, semi-evil dad, Mr. Blake Cross. And she wants to help so much, but he just doesn’t want her to. They break up, but, as predictable as every book targeted to the teenage girl, they get back together.
 
The last part of the book was hardest to understand. Cora and Jamie are taking Ruby somewhere, but it is never specified.
 
But I enjoyed this book. My twelve-year-old brother kept trying to talk to me in the car, but I was reading. And anyone that knows me understands how little I will tolerate when it comes to interruption of exciting, recreational literature. Better, though, is that I was texting Hattie the entire time.
 
Read the book. Read this blog. Comment. Buy the book. Support me.

North of Beautiful (Justina Chen Headley)

So, my best friend (more like sister), Hattie, had me wait forever to read this book about a girl from Colville, Washington, with a huge, obnoxious, obvious port-wine stain on the right side of her face. For those of you that don’t understand, a port-wine stain is a birth mark that kind of looks like wine was spilled on your face. And Hattie told our friend Tony he could borrow it. Why he’d want to read a teenage girly book, I have no idea.
 
So, the girl, Terra, has gone through all this laser treatment and nothing has worked. Then one day, as they’re going back home, Terra nearly runs over a sixteen-year-old Chinese boy, Jacob, and Terra and her mother go with Jacob and his adopted mom, Nora, to go visit Terra’s big brother Merc in China. Then Terra goes on to find true beauty and accidentally falls in love with Jacob, even though she has a boyfriend, Eric, at home. So, et cetera, et cetera. Eventually Terra breaks up with Eric and Jacob and Terra can live happily after.
 
Now, I have four more things to say. 1.) This was an excellent book. Each time I uncovered something in the book, I would go up to her the next day and totally flip out. “Why didn’t you tell me that, Hattie?!” 2.)  Get it. Like I said. Great book. 3.) Hattie and I wonder – is it Merc like Mercer Island, but without the -er, or is it Merc like Mercury without the -cury? 4.) Please respond to these reviews. Also give people this site address. I want more readers. The more readers I get, the easier it’ll be for me to publish a book.
 
Thanks for reading! ~Flik

The Lost Hero (Rick Riordan)


For my recent birthday, my friend Kelli ( http://klmsbookreviews.blogspot.com)gave me a hardback (thank you!) copy of the first ‘Heroes of Olympus’ book, “The Lost
Hero.” Now, you might think that this ‘Lost Hero’ guy is the main character. But that’s not it. The lost hero comes into play when this kid, Jason, and his friends Piper McLean, daughter of Aphrodite and movie star Tristan McLean, and Leo Valdez, son of Hephaestus and a deseased mother, show up at Camp Half-Blood. Jason thinks of the gods in their Roman forms, speaks Latin, and is the full brother of Thalia Grace. Annabeth Chase, daughter of Athena, tells them that her boyfriend, Percy Jackson, is missing. But Jason, Piper and Leo first have to free Hera, or, to Jason, Juno. The three go on a quest to save the goddess, and after they get back to Camp, Jason and Annabeth agree that, if Jason came from a Roman Camp, and is at Camp Half-Blood, without any memory, Percy must be at Jason’s camp, known as the child of Neptune.
 
It’s not a Percy Jackson book, sure, but “The Lost Hero” is definitely just as good. Rick Riordan is a great author, and when he dies, people will remember his books like we remember anybody else with works that we revere. Thank you, Riordan, for the material to pass the time with and to entertain me so much. I apologize about my summary, but it was a little bit complicated to do this. After all, this is a great book and good books are hard to write reviews on.