Category Archives: Realistic-Fiction

Struts & Frets

So, on Sunday, I went to the Library to print stuff. Mum made me get a book. Well, the teen section sucks. Stuff I’ve never heard of before, nothing that seemed friendly and opening. Then, there was a light green spine with the word ‘Frets’, and, being a guitar player, I immediately picked it up… And finished it last night around 8.
 
‘Struts & Frets’ by Jon Skovron is about a 17-year-old boy named Sammy Bojar who plays guitar in his very dysfunctional band, Tragedy of Wisdom. (In the very beginning, it explains that Sammy wishes it was ‘Tragedy of Reason’ because ‘Wisdom’ made no sense.) Anyway, the band is made up of skinny TJ, their drummer; Rick, the gay bassist; and Joe, the terrifying, ill-tempered frontman; and, as previously stated, Sammy, who plays guitar and writes songs for the band.
Early in the book, he realizes that his best friend, Jen5 (Jennifer, Jenny, Jen, and J had already been claimed by the four other Jennifers in their class) really likes him. Then they start dating. Tragedy of Wisdom enters a Battle of the Bands…
 
It’s difficult to explain without too many spoilers. Sorry. 🙂
 
Anyway, I really enjoyed this book. It really explains how difficult it is to keep together a band that doesn’t really even work well. But it was an amazing book, and I’d totally suggest it to anyone who likes music and explanations of reality. It’s great. I actually read it a ton, and now I’m reading it again, it was that good.
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The Stress That is High School and Markus Zusak

Let me start with apologizing for not posting in a while. I mean, I just started high school about a week after I posted about “The Sorcerer’s Stone” then I was moving away from the little town I had lived in for all of my 14 years and have been in a small city where I have now been in Junior High with 8th and 9th graders for a little over a month. Unfortunately for me, this Junior High School has about 2000 students. And my old town’s population was under 2000 total (1763 at the last census, I believe).
 
But one very good thing has come out of this move- “I Am the Messenger” by Markus Zusak.
 
About a week after I started school here, my English class was informed that we would do a “Hero’s Journey Workshop” in which we would choose from the selected books to read in three weeks. Everyone who chose that book would be in a group together to go over what we’ve read in one week.
 
I chose “I Am the Messenger” by Markus Zusak. It’s a great book. It takes place in a little town right outside Sydney, Australia. It starts with this guy, Ed Kennedy, and his best friends Marv, Ritchie and Audrey. They’re all in bank as it’s being held up. Marv goes on to Ed that he can’t afford a parking ticket because he’s in a fifteen-minute parking spot. Ed manages to get the gunman who’s robbing the bank to try Marv’s car as a getaway vehicle, which “has about a five percent chance of starting on the first go.” Gunman gets arrested. Happy-happy-joy-joy, right?
 
I think not.
 
Ed gets the Ace of Diamonds with 3 addresses and times written on it. Ed goes to these places and saves the day and all that. Then he gets the other Aces and delivers those messages. I would love to tell you the last two lines, which are probably my favorite lines ever, but they sort of spoil the book.
 
Don’t go looking at the back of the book, though. I usually do, but when I read this book, I didn’t because I didn’t need the extra push to finish it. Definitely one of the best books ever written. I loved it. And, even though it’s got the most common character thing at the current time (the main character being in love with his/her best friend), I thought it was great.
 
The characters are realistic; they swear and act like normal people. The plot is pretty simple; no wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey stuff. The setting is easy to relate to; the book was written in 2003, so you can sort of relate to it. And, of course, it’s just really well-written.
 
I’ll try my best to write more often. I’m reading a James Herriot book right now for outside of English class, so that review should be quite interesting.
 
[Ms Barden, you rock for using this book for a choice! I loved it, and I love your class. And, no, I’m not brown-nosing. It just seems that my English teachers are always the ones I connect to the most. You’re really cool, and I apologize for not telling you about the vocab thing earlier. 😦 Sorry.]

Lock and Key (Sarah Dessen)

So, as school got out on tuesday and I went to Hattie’s house that day, and I was dragged to her 4H meeting half an hour from our hometown, she had me read (yet another) of the books she has gotten from book fairs in the library at our school. So, in the course of the two to three hours, I got thirty or forty pages into this book.
 
In this novel, nearly-eighteen-year-old Ruby Cooper has been living alone with her mom since her older sister, Cora, left them to go to college. Ruby’s mom dissappears, though, and Ruby finds herself living with Cora, her husband and CEO/founder of social networking site UMe.com, Jamie, and their yappy, scared-to-death-of-the-oven-and-smoke-detectors, little-bitty dog, Roscoe. On her first night, Ruby tries to run off, but she can’t find the gate to the wooden fence behind Cora aand Jamie’s house, so she happens to meet Nate Cross, their neighbor, as he’s swimming laps in his pool.
 
Eventually, of course, Nate and Ruby end up together. And, even better, Cora and Ruby find their mom – in a rehab clinic in Tennesee.
 
Nate won’t make it easy for Ruby to help him with his hot-tempered, semi-evil dad, Mr. Blake Cross. And she wants to help so much, but he just doesn’t want her to. They break up, but, as predictable as every book targeted to the teenage girl, they get back together.
 
The last part of the book was hardest to understand. Cora and Jamie are taking Ruby somewhere, but it is never specified.
 
But I enjoyed this book. My twelve-year-old brother kept trying to talk to me in the car, but I was reading. And anyone that knows me understands how little I will tolerate when it comes to interruption of exciting, recreational literature. Better, though, is that I was texting Hattie the entire time.
 
Read the book. Read this blog. Comment. Buy the book. Support me.

North of Beautiful (Justina Chen Headley)

So, my best friend (more like sister), Hattie, had me wait forever to read this book about a girl from Colville, Washington, with a huge, obnoxious, obvious port-wine stain on the right side of her face. For those of you that don’t understand, a port-wine stain is a birth mark that kind of looks like wine was spilled on your face. And Hattie told our friend Tony he could borrow it. Why he’d want to read a teenage girly book, I have no idea.
 
So, the girl, Terra, has gone through all this laser treatment and nothing has worked. Then one day, as they’re going back home, Terra nearly runs over a sixteen-year-old Chinese boy, Jacob, and Terra and her mother go with Jacob and his adopted mom, Nora, to go visit Terra’s big brother Merc in China. Then Terra goes on to find true beauty and accidentally falls in love with Jacob, even though she has a boyfriend, Eric, at home. So, et cetera, et cetera. Eventually Terra breaks up with Eric and Jacob and Terra can live happily after.
 
Now, I have four more things to say. 1.) This was an excellent book. Each time I uncovered something in the book, I would go up to her the next day and totally flip out. “Why didn’t you tell me that, Hattie?!” 2.)  Get it. Like I said. Great book. 3.) Hattie and I wonder – is it Merc like Mercer Island, but without the -er, or is it Merc like Mercury without the -cury? 4.) Please respond to these reviews. Also give people this site address. I want more readers. The more readers I get, the easier it’ll be for me to publish a book.
 
Thanks for reading! ~Flik